Archive for the ‘iphone’ Category

New posts at Urbin Technology

September 9, 2008

New posts over at Urbin Technology.

Rev1 iPhones go up in value.

Google buys rights to new high res satellite photos.

Is Google planning a Navy?

A Good etext reader for the iPhone

August 17, 2008

It’s called Bookshelf, and yes, it costs money. I found it worth the $10

It supports a wide range of formats including ASCII text, HTML, AportisDoc, unencrypted Mobipocket, rft & Word Docs (not docx).

I can access my Baen webscription account from it and download books directly as well as tapping their free etext library.

There is also a Java app that you can load on your computer in order to load books you already have from other sources.

So far, I’m really pleased. A good move by Baen to support this, since Mobipocket has been very quiet about exactly when they were going to produce an iPhone app.

First posted at Urbin Technology.

A possible first.

August 2, 2008

I quoted Malcolm X in a tech blog.

About those iPhone apps

July 16, 2008

I have a post about iPhone apps over at Urbin Technology.

New iPhone firmware

July 11, 2008

I’m installing it now. Details to be posted later at Urbin Technology.

Opening up the iPhone

March 10, 2008

Apple finally released a SDK. MIT Tech Review looks at what this could mean:

“This is a huge deal,” says Ken Case, CEO of Omni Group, a company that implements ideas from David Allen’s Getting Things Done in organizational software for the Mac operating system. “Apple has built this small handheld computer that’s based around the same fundamental technology of the Mac. What [the SDK] means for us is that we now have the opportunity to build software that people have been clamoring for since the iPhone was announced.”

Businesses will be more likely to dole out iPhones to employees because, in addition to e-mail compatibility and synching ability, Apple is now offering a way for employees to access business servers that are behind firewalls. Moreover, the phones can be cleared of all data remotely, if they are lost or stolen.

Nonetheless, says Allen, it’s still not a complete free-for-all. It’s not clear whether programmers will have access to certain layers of information about the phone, such as those that could allow them to build Bluetooth peripherals like keyboards. Allen says that he hasn’t yet had a chance to dive deeply into the SDK, but he’s not sure whether it will allow for software that lets iPhone users receive data, such as instant messages, while they’re placing calls over the cellular network (something that’s not possible now).